Democratising access to justice: the comic contract as intersemiotic translation

This article, produced by a Finnish University examines the process of creating comic contracts, where the legal text is translated into comics, and argues that this process can be viewed as an intersemiotic translation (where the basis of cultural communication through which ideas are circulated, translated and explained using language, images and other semiotic resources.

Read the full article by Eliisa Pitkasalo and Laura Kalliomaa-Puha HERE

Convergence and fragmentation: legal research, legal informatics and legal education

EJLT article

Fragmentation and convergence are two discoursal lenses that have been used to view changes that have taken place in the domains of legal services, the legal profession, regulation and legal education. While they may appear orthogonal, the relationships between them are intimate, sophisticated, constantly shifting and require much more analysis.

Read the full article by Paul Maharg for the European Journal of Law and Technology HERE.

The Value of Visuals

TechSmith logo

We’ve always known that visuals are essential to the effectiveness of communication, and therefore are essential to instruct and inspire. The essential findings of this study are, first, that visuals matter even more than most assume and second, there is an urgency for leaders to adapt as employee demographics change.

Read the full article by TechSmith HERE.

Deliberate Communication with Pictures: A Science Fiction?

Deliberate Communication with Pictures - A Science Fiction?

The future is most likely to witness the further compression of writing, not its total eradication; it is likely that the co-presence of writing and pictures makes for clearest communication. How would communicators be trained to be productive members of such a world?

Read the full article by Stuart Medley HERE.

New contract genres

New Contract Genres - Haapio, de Rooy & Barton

Contracts, once almost exclusively written by lawyers for lawyers, are undergoing a major transformation. Technology and design have enabled entirely new contract genres. When the focus shifts from legal issues to functionality and ease of use, automation and communication come to the fore. We envision a future where contracts are designed to contain code, text, sound, visuals, comics, and more. They work for both computers and humans, on and off screen: they can auto-execute desired terms as well as guide human behavior toward more collaborative and productive ends.

Read the full article written by Helena Haapio, Robert de Rooy and Thomas D. Barton HERE.